Tag Archives: bisexual

Lame Adventure 451: Appropriate Behavior

Recently I attended a screening at the Film Society of Lincoln Center of Appropriate Behavior, a romantic comedy set in Brooklyn about hipsters. Shirin is an Iranian-American bisexual obsessing about Maxine, her cool butch lesbian ex-girlfriend, following their crash and burn breakup. The story time travels back and forth when they were happily together in the recent past with newly single Shirin disastrously coping in her miserable present. My expectations for this film hovered at the bottom of the ocean. Much to my surprise, I found this briskly paced debut feature by screenwriter-director-star, Desiree Akhavan, who plays Shirin, entertaining. It’s witty, she’s pretty and this edgy tale is packed with sex, angst and colorful glimpses into Iranian American culture and customs.

What’s not to like?

Something I wasn’t wild about was The Knuckle Dragger who stood directly in front of me completely blocking my view after the film ended, just as the q&a was about to start. Eventually, Lurch realized that they had more in common with a door than a window. Often, I find the questions asked in film screening q&a’s painfully stupid. For example:

Audience Member: How many of you [actors] were playing yourself?

Did this person think that Akhavan had directed a documentary?

Desiree Akhavan standing as she fields audience questions.

Desiree Akhavan (standing) as she fields audience questions.

Akhavan, who has extensively screened her film on the festival circuit, was an admirable pro fielding such an idiotic question that drew audience gasps or maybe I was just hearing the sound of my own less than silent GERD. I later realized that it could be interpreted as a backhanded compliment. Akhavan did a commendable job directing her actors who were very well cast. She and Rebecca Henderson, who plays Maxine, had palpable chemistry.

Akhavan has been referred to as “the Persian Lena Dunham”. Dunham is a major player in the zeitgeist and no doubt Akhavan would love to follow that “it” girl’s influential lead. The comparisons are obvious: Akhavan has screen presence, a clever way with words and she is very comfortable both behind and in front of the camera. For the fourth and current season of Girls, Dunham has written Akhavan into her hit series. That strikes me as a vote of confidence from Dunham to Akhavan.

During the q&a Akhavan admitted that her screenplay was influenced by Woody Allen’s Annie Hall. In lieu of revealing any spoilers, I detected some homage to Mike Nichols’ The Graduate. Appropriate Behavior also brought to mind an early Ang Lee film, The Wedding Banquet, a romantic comedy about an Asian American son’s anxiety over admitting that he is gay to his immigrant parents. Shirin is in the closet to her parents. The stress to come out contributes to her neurosis and adds to her problems with Maxine. Akhavan is blatantly and subtly borrowing from some of the best veteran filmmakers, but I also recognized a unique voice and perspective that is her own. I look forward to seeing what she directs next.

Desiree Akhavan

Desiree Akhavan – you go girl! (Dress from Opening Ceremony for those into knowing that sort of thing).

Appropriate Behavior opens January 16th in New York City at the IFC Center, and theaters in select cities coast to coast. Check local listings. It’s also available on iTunes. Sex, partial nudity, drugs and 90 painless minutes when q&a-free.

Advertisements

Lame Adventure 382: Big Apple Gay Pride Parade 2013

Sunday was the annual Gay Pride march in Manhattan. Milton and I attended with cameras in tow. It was an exuberant celebration on the heels of the Supreme Court’s recent decision overturning the Domestic Marriage Act as well as clearing the way for same sex couples to resume having the right to wed in California. The victorious DOMA plaintiff, 84-year-old Edie Windsor, was one of the parade’s three grand marshals. Seeing her was quite a high.

This is also a mayoral election year in New York City. Christine Quinn, the openly lesbian Speaker of the New York City Council, is a mayoral candidate who has recently received Edie’s endorsement. Quinn is leading in the polls today, but former Congressman Anthony Weiner is gaining on her and possibly Public Advocate Bill de Blasio has an outside chance, too. It’s a long way between June and November.

Aside from politicians avidly courting the LGBT voter, the parade was also heavy with product placement in hot pursuit of the LGBT dollar. Big corporations that participated include Delta Airlines, AT&T, Citibank and Coca Cola. Macy’s, Whole Foods and Kiehls had a strong presence, too. Vitamin Water had some poor schmuck or schmuck-ette dressed like a bottle of water march in the steam heat. Overall, the parade was primarily about LGBT people compelled to cheer their recent victories, strut their stuff and feel good about whom they are.

On a personal note, I am very pleased to announce that I experienced my own triumph this year. I did not suffer any further hearing loss, step in any fetid puddles or deep fry any body part, all mishaps I have suffered in past years while covering this annual event with Milton for Lame Adventures. Naturally, I half-expected to find myself swallowed by the sidewalk, but that didn’t happen, either. Therefore, I’ll let the pictures we shot tell the rest of the story.

Love is in the air.

Pride and victory are in the air.

Then, there is this woman who let it all hang out for the duration.

Then, there is this woman who let it all hang out for the duration.

Feeling pumped waiting for the march to start.

Feeling pumped waiting for the march to start.

Dykes on bikes kick it off!

Dykes on bikes kick it off!

The good hair day twins.

The good hair day twins.

The annual showing of balloons.

The annual showing of balloons.

Milton thought this chap's leotard was Dorothy Hamil-inspired.

Milton thought this chap’s leotard was Dorothy Hamil-inspired. His flower made me crave sunflower seeds.

Our award for Best Sign.

The Lame Adventures award for Best Sign.

Grand Marshall Harry Belafonte!

Grand Marshall Harry Belafonte!

Grand Marshall Edie Windsor in hat with red band.

Grand Marshall Edie Windsor in hat with red band.

A bloke we've seen every year at Pride.

A literally bird-brained bloke we’ve seen every year at Pride.

New York Senator Chuck Schumer.

New York Senator Chuck Schumer.

Rainbow Brite.

Rainbow Brite.

Edie Windsor fans.

Edie Windsor fans literally and figuratively.

Product placement.

Product placement.

LGBT center float.

LGBT center float.

Mr. Short Shorts.

Mr. Short Shorts front and center.

Family guys i.e., Mr. Long Shorts.

Family guys i.e., Mr. Long Shorts.

Big cheers for Governor Cuomo!

Big cheers for Governor Cuomo!

Rainbow dress.

Rainbow dress.

Lesbian moms.

Lesbian moms.

Blonde ambition.

Blonde ambition.

Kiehls float.

Kiehls float.

Kiddie pride.

Kiddie pride.

Scooter and bare breast pride.

Together at last: scooter and bare bazoom pride.

Paddles and pads shriek, "NFL!"

Paddles and pads shriek, “NFL!”

Girl pride.

Girl pride.

Butch dyke pride.

Butch dyke pride.

Brokeback Mountain...The Neo-realist version.

Brokeback Mountain …The Neo-realist version.

Shouting pride.

Shouting pride.

Why walk when you can ride the recline-o-cycle.

Why walk when you can ride the recline-o-cycle.

Wilted sombrero pride.

Clapping wilted sombrero pride.

Milton calls this "What the fuck...?"

Milton calls this “What the fuck…?”

New York City police commissioner Ray Kelly.

New York City police commissioner Ray Kelly.

Gay cop color guard.

Gay cop color guard.

Gay firefighters and EMT's.

Gay firefighters and EMT’s.

Cop ordering phone booth perches to dismount,

Cop ordering phone booth perching pals to dismount.

Yes and yes.

Yes and yes.

Attitude.

Attitude.

Of course, Scout Troop 69!

Of course, Scout Troop 69!

Prancing with friend.

Prancing with friend.

The Flaggots are back!

The Flaggots are back!

Bi Request — offering something for just about everyone.

Bi Request — offering something for just about everyone.

Milton: "Not everyone should copy Tarzan."

Milton: “Not everyone should copy Tarzan.”

Pretty boys.

Back to regularly scheduled programming: pretty boys.

Russians are coming.

Russians are coming.

Latino pride.

Latino pride.

Eye-catching.

Eye-catching.

Feathered friends.

Feathered friends.

Exuberance!

Exuberance!

Just the place to find Harem Boy and Mad Hatter.

Just the place to find Harem Boy and Mad Hatter.

"Let's put on a show!"

“Let’s put on a show!”

Actions speak louder than words.

This magic moment.

Boy marching with Rainbow Girl.

Boy marching with Rainbow Girl.

Go Magazine: stick around — meow!

Go Magazine: stick around — meow!

The Big Gay Apple is here!

The Big Gay Apple is here!

Lady bugs!

Lady bugs!

Contrast in styles.

Contrast in styles.

In lieu of feathers, rainbow tube balloons.

In lieu of feathers, rainbow tube balloons.

Marching with who else? A live snake.

Marching with what else? A live snake.

Equality marchers.

Equality marchers.

Nice hat.

Nice hat.

Nice shoes.

Nice shoes.

Strike a pose.

Strike a pose.

Shake that thing!

Shake that thing!

Well accessorized.

Well accessorized.

Perfect day to wear a bikini and feathers.

Perfect day to wear a bikini and feathers.

The Golden Girls have arrived!

The Golden Girls have arrived!

Happy in tape and feathers.

Happy in tape and feathers.

Tribute to grandma.

Tribute to grandma.

Weiner!

Weiner!

Mayoral candidate Anthony Weiner.

Mayoral candidate Anthony Weiner.

Drummer girl.

Drummer girl.

Indonesian pride.

Indonesian pride.

Happy together.

Happy together.

Rainbow flag ears? This guy's get-up irritated Milton.

Rainbow flag ears? This guy’s get-up irritated Milton.

Not housework attire: feathered mask and rainbow cape.

Not housework attire: feathered mask and rainbow cape.

Bustier.

Bustier.

Hold that pose.

Hold that pose.

Feathers.

Feathers.

Having it and flaunting it.

Having it and flaunting it.

Moving on from marriage to fracking?

Moving on from marriage to fracking?

Public Advocate and mayoral candidate Bill De Blasio.

Public Advocate and mayoral candidate Bill de Blasio.

Conversation can be very nice.

Thanks for sharing.

Madonna, watch out! Bearadonna's coming!

Madonna, watch out! Bearadonna’s here!

The Log Cabin Republicans are here — all three of them.

The Log Cabin Republicans are here — all three of them.

Hula hoop lady.

Hula hoop lady.

Mayoral candidate Christine Quinn in orange slacks with her spouse Kim Cattullo.

Mayoral candidate Christine Quinn in orange slacks with her spouse Kim Catullo.

Massive Quinn contingency or as Milton said, "It's like she's Madonna."

Massive showing of Quinn supporters or as Milton said, “It’s like she’s Madonna.”

Gotcha shot of Milton and me.

Gotcha shot of Milton and me.

Lame Adventure 232: Papering the House

Last week Milton scored an invitation for two to the Film Society of Lincoln Center’s blue carpet 50th anniversary celebration of Breakfast at Tiffany’sThe film is also being released on Blu-ray DVD.

We want you, Milton!

This Hollywood classic stars Audrey Hepburn as Holly Golightly, in her most iconic role, a free-spirit that accepts $50 from gentlemen admirers for powder room visits; George Peppard, as Paul Varjak, a struggling writer with perfect hair; and Patricia Neal, as 2E, Paul’s cougar sugar-mama.  2E does not exist in author Truman Capote‘s original novella, nor is the writer named Paul Varjak and he actually works a crummy day job, something the filmmakers must have considered too tragic to show on the silver screen.

Perfect Hair George frame left, Audrey Hepburn center, Patricia Neal frame right.

Screen legend in her own right, Julie Andrews, the widow of the film’s director, Blake Edwards, was enlisted to walk the blue carpet en route to delivering an introduction before the screening of the beautifully restored print at Alice Tulley Hall in Lincoln Center.

Even though other attendees paid for their seats, since the screening was not sold out, the FSLC emailed members that they could have a pair of tickets for free on a first come, first serve basis.  Milton said we were being tagged to paper the house.

Milton:  Do you want to go?

Me:  From now on call me Boise-Cascade!

Precious ducat.

Press and photographers crowded the space in front of the blue carpet making it tough for onlookers like us to see much behind a barricade. One of a cluster of women of a certain age who very likely first saw the film when it was initially released in 1961 opined about the blue carpet:

Woman of a Certain Age:  That’s the blue carpet?  It looks more like a bathroom rug.

Crappy blue carpet.

Milton and I agreed that she had the right idea.

A celebrity arrived, actress Bebe Neuwirth and her husband, Chris Calkins.

Bebe Neuwirth with her husband Chris Calkins of the Obscured Face.

The women of a certain age banter amongst each other.

Woman of a Certain Age:  Who is that?  Is that Rachel’s daughter?

Me (thinking):  Who the hell’s Rachel?  That’s Bebe Neuwirth.

Another Woman of a Certain Age:  I think that’s Bebe Neuwirth.

Woman of a Certain Age (who thought Bebe was Rachel’s daughter):  How old is she now?

Another Woman of a Certain Age:  Who?

Woman of a Certain Age:  This Bebe Neuwirth we’re looking at.  What is she, 60?  Do you like how she looks?

I want to scream, but I’m mute.  For the record, Bebe’s 52.  Milton and I thought she looked great.

Press swarming Bebe.

There’s a roar to our left.  For a flash Milton and I think that Holly Golightly has arrived, but it’s second best, Julie Andrews is in the house!  She looks radiant wearing a blue tuxedo, which should have been the shade of the carpet.

Milton times this shot of Juiie Andrews perfectly.

Milton is on a tear taking pictures with his iPhone, but he presses the wrong button and he starts photographing himself beneath the chin, so we have a selection of shots of his goatee at an odd angle.

I am not allowed to post any of those images.

Fortunately, we get a few decent shots, so decent that a woman of a certain age declares:

Woman of a Certain Age:  You finally got a good one!

My good shot of Julie Andrews. Finally.

Once Julie, who takes her time talking to members of the press and posing for photographs moves on, a blonde enters.

Mystery "Who cares?" Woman.

Me:  Who’s that?

Milton: Probably a real housewife of Lincoln Square.

A cameraman starts filming us.

Filming us. We return the compliment.

We lower our cameras and head into the theater.

After I take this shot a guard approaches me:

Inside the theater.

Guard:  There’s no photography in the theater.

I pack my camera away, but when Julie takes the stage with the FSLC program Director, Richard Peña, it seems like every iPhone in the joint is whipped out.

Julie Andrews and Richard Peña moments earlier on the crappy blue carpet.

I could easily breakout my camera again, but instead, I breakout a ham sandwich.  It’s late and I’m hungry.

Julie and Peña conduct an easy exchange about the film.  She was appearing on Broadway when she first saw it on her day off in 1961 at Radio City Music Hall.

Julie:  I never dreamed that the director would be my husband.

This makes sense since she would remain married to designer Tony Walton for another six years.

She speaks warmly about Audrey Hepburn, who became a close friend of hers, and says that Blake Edwards adored her, too:

Julie:  She might have been my competition!

She speaks about the memorable party sequence and says that Blake:

Julie: Cast his friends and everyone he knew.

After praising the contribution of Hubert de Givenchy’s wardrobe, Julie announces:

Julie: When you’ve got Audrey Hepburn and Hubert de Givenchy, I don’t think anyone for a second believed that this was a heavy hooker, for God’s sake.

This is true, the screenplay that George Axelrod loosely adapted from Capote’s  novella takes many liberties with the author’s beautifully crafted World War II era story; a much grittier and poignant tale that I recently read again.  Capote wanted Marilyn Monroe cast in the role of Holly, an excellent choice, but she turned down the part because she was advised that playing a woman of questionable repute would not be good for her image.  Milton thinks that had Marilyn played the part instead of Audrey, she would have won an Academy Award.  Also, happily ever after romance lovers, although this harder, colder creature is recognizably Holly, and the writer-narrator is both fascinated and smitten with her, they’re just platonic friends.  Holly is from start to finish “a wild thing” — untameable, independent and mysterious.  She also eludes to being bisexual, something else excluded from the script.

Milton wonders if Capote was livid about the boatload of changes made to the source material to make it the crowd-pleaser it’s been for fifty years.  He deems this film is a precursor to another highly successful and completely implausible fairy tale romance, Pretty Woman.  I reason that back in 1961, there was no way that this novella’s darker open-ended tale could have been adapted.  Yet,  the audience at this anniversary screening seemed to be watching in a state of bliss.   What brings out the sap in me about this film is the Academy Award winning Henry Mancini score and the song Moon River with lyrics by Johnny Mercer.   That catchy song has been playing on a loop inside my head for a solid week.  Every time I come across the lyric “my Huckleberry friend” I’m stumped.  What the hell is that?  The Urban Dictionary has two answers:

1. A very special, good friend that’s been in your life for years, typically since youth.

2. A fuck buddy.

Outside the theater, following the screening Milton and I are a safe distance from the adoring masses.  He voices a unique observation about this film that surely would have gotten both of us killed if said inside:

Milton:  Just because something’s classic doesn’t mean it’s good.

Fifty years later, we’d like to suggest the unthinkable – not a remake, but a version of Breakfast at Tiffany’s that is true to Capote’s original novella.  Todd Haynes, if you’re wondering what to work on next, how about giving this a try?

Source material.

Milton and I noticed that the one character that perfectly made the transition from novella to screen was Holly’s “poor slob without a name” cat played by Orangey.  He certainly made the most of his close-ups.

Orangey as Cat center frame.

Lame Adventure 112: Orlando the Ultimate She-Man

Thursday night after work, Milton and I met at the Classic Stage Company, an off-Broadway theater to see Sarah Ruhl’s adaptation of the Virginia Woolf novel, Orlando.  In my confused youth, the second I whiffed that Woolf had written a gender bending time-traveling semi-biographical story about and for Vita Sackville-West, a woman she had an affair with in the 1920s, fireworks exploded in my head.  My friends were drooling over David Cassidy, Bobby Sherman, and Donny Osmond, a trinity of bland teen idols I found about as exciting as a TV test pattern.  What excited me was getting my sweaty little mitts on that book about a nobleman who transforms into a noblewoman.  The premise blew my adolescent mind.  Orlando was my first exposure to Woolf.  Since I was barely 13, I found the story completely bewildering.  Yet, I managed to read it in its entirety even though it essentially entered one eyeball and exited the other.

Early edition of the novel.

Years later, in 1992, filmmaker Sally Potter directed an accessible film version of Orlando featuring Tilda Swinton in the title role, and Quentin Crisp as Queen Elizabeth I.  Billy Zane played Orlando’s male love interest; this was when he had long flowing tresses and looked dashing.  Nearly twenty years later, what I most recall from the film was after Orlando changes genders from male to female, she looks straight at the camera and matter-of-factly states, “Same person, no difference at all.  Just a different sex.”  I loved that moment and have been a Tilda Swinton fan ever since.

Movie poster.

Sarah Ruhl’s spirited theatrical adaptation makes me want to give reading the novel another try, but more likely, Milton will rent the DVD of the film on Netflix and he’ll let me borrow it.  The play is packed with droll wit.  Director Rebecca Taichman has overseen a very inventive production.  Even though the set, designed by Allen Moyer, is minimalist with a giant mirror suspended over a large swatch of fake grass filling the stage, this use of artifice perfectly personifies nature as a shimmery sheet symbolizes snow and ice.  Another element that contributes to this production’s depth is Annie-B Parson’s flowing choreography.  The entire ensemble cast deserves a loud shout out.  Their energy is vital in bringing this story to vivid life.  Francesca Faridany is wonderful as ageless Orlando, in any gender.  At one point, she exited the stage to sit on the theater’s steps where she continued to interact with her fellow cast members from afar.

She sat next to me.

I thought, “This is surreal. Orlando is sitting next to me.”  My next thought was, “I so hope I don’t sneeze or cough right now.”  For once my body functions did not betray me.

David Greenspan, a man of many vocal inflections, is hilarious as Queen Elizabeth I and a cloying duchess who later returns as an equally cloying duke.  Tom Nelis is spot on as both a multiple hankie dropping jilted girlfriend and Marmaduke Bonthrop Shelmerdine, the man Orlando marries, as well as numerous other characters.  He can also belt out a song in grand opera style.  Howard Overshawn in one moment embodies a maidservant who vows to never remove her wedding ring and just as easily segues into the solicitous captain of a ship.  Fluid gender bending is everywhere in this play, with the sole exception of lovely Annika Boras’s Sasha, the ethereal ice skating Russian princess that breaks Orlando’s heart in his male youth.

Girls playing boys and boys playing queens.

At the play’s close, Orlando exuberantly declares, “I’m beginning to understand now!”

As does the audience.

Then, the actors took their bows to rapturous applause.  Once the cast left the stage, the audience made a stampede for the exit with such aggression, a guy who could have been the body double for Sasquatch stepped on my candy bar, giving me the impression that he and almost everyone else in the room had been trapped in a deep hole in Chile for 69 days, as opposed to two hours in Virginia Woolf’s Wonderland courtesy of Sarah Ruhl.

Closing Sunday October 17th.

Lame Adventure 65: Pride Baby!

Milton and I celebrated gay pride New York City-style this weekend by watching the LGBT Pride March from the sidelines on lower Fifth Avenue near West 16th Street.  As we played dueling digital cameras in the humid heat, we did not complain for it did not rain on our parade, something I feared might happen.  We also kept ourselves well hydrated.  I had my 20-ounce bottle of water and Milton guzzled an entire Poland Spring water truck personally before we shared a liter of refreshing mango (not served by Chris Kattan) sangria over dinner afterward.

The parade itself was an uplifting event.  Marriage, family, religious acceptance and equality were key themes.  We noticed many members of organized faiths marching.  In the forty years that this event has been taking place, it’s very moving to see the progress that has been made.  Milton and I both got lumps in our throats when we saw the contingency from the New York Police Department in their dress blues march past.  Forty-one years ago when the Stonewall riots ignited in Greenwich Village, the police bashed the patrons to the point of inciting revolt.  That was the pivotal event that started the pride movement that continues today, but who would have ever anticipated that a battalion of out gay and lesbian cops would march proudly in such a parade?  And they were followed by the out gay and lesbian firefighters.  What’s next out and proud Catholic priests and nuns?  Oops, better not go there.

The person standing next to me, an individual of indeterminate gender who I thought was female, but Milton swore he saw an Adam’s apple, doubled as a human vuvuzela forever blowing a piercing whistle to entice marchers to come her way.  Standing along side this exuberantly demonstrative parade-goer for three hours and forty-five minutes was a bit taxing for both of us.  The limited hearing in my impaired right ear is undoubtedly further decreased, but I pointed out to Milton that “Blow Tart” (our name for this person) was not the worst person in the world.  It was not like we were stuck standing next to Osama bin Laden and his dialysis machine.  Afterward, I asked Milton what he thought someone like Blow Tart did for a living.  He suggested in a droll tone, “Annoy people.  She’s great at her job.”

Posted below are some of our photographs and because we’re devils, a little video we shot of Blow Tart that we posted on YouTube.  This better illustrates why Milton’s knee-jerk response is “idiot” every time I mention this person.  Overall, it was a lovely parade, and we did have a great time.

Traditional parade start with Yikes! on Bikes.

Lovely Yike on her Bike.

Bride of Pride.

Grand Marshal Judy Shepard, Matthew Shepard's mom.

Grand Marshal US Army Lieutenant Dan Choi, West Point graduate and gay rights activist trying to overturn Don't Ask Don't Tell.

Horse drawn Wells Fargo carriage.

Parade worker cleaning crap emitted from Wells Fargo carriage horse prompting Milton to say, "Don't shit on our parade!"

Marriage fairness fighters.

Delta wants LGBT dollars.

Banner says all.

Banner says all but some of us fall between these two poles.

Still on the topic of poles, don't try this at home unless your name is Madonna.

Does not look any easier from this angle, either.

The blood rushed to both our heads just watching this. The dancer is 27-year-old Marlo Fiskin. Her partner is pedaling the bike.

Our senator Chuck Schumer!

A perfect day for a parasol and fan. Why didn't we think of that?

Hebrew National Pride.

NYPD Pride.

NYC Firefighter Pride.

Moms and bambinos.

Beautiful Pride Tot.

Milton's "what the hell" shot of Mr. & Mr. Smith.

If you got it, parade it.

Milton's sweaty paw holding a parade button he caught.

AOL ice cream truck giving out no ice cream.

Fellow bloggers!

Nice day to stroll in your underwear.

Topless girls in hard hats. Meow!

Topless boys clinching.

Mister Pansy Pride.

Buff guy that somehow caught Milton's eye.

Buff guy and buff bud endorsing TD Bank -- move over Regis Philbin.

Asian Pride!

Asian Pride boy feeling good.

Is that you, Courtney Love?

Boys from Peru flaunting it.

Boys from Peru swishing by.

Boy from Peru showing off.

In the mood to wear a top hat.

Peacock.

Wow.

Who the fuck is this bitch with a whistle?

Whistle.

New York Congressman Anthony Weiner -- "Isn't it great to have a name like Weiner on gay pride day?"

They agree with Congressman Weiner!

New York Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney.

Banner says it all.

Under Construction.

Drag queen in need of a Red Bull.

Cleopatra's assistants.

Big Apple Corps Marching Band.

Big Apple Corps Marching Band marching.

Big Apple Corps Marching Band tuba players or as Milton said, "They even have tuba players in this parade!"

Just legalize it.

Okay.

Rich lash mascara!

Pump your fist for pride!

In the spirit of La Cage aux Folles ...

Working out on lower Fifth Avenue.

Daddy-Mommy dearest.

As long as everyone's consenting ...

We want to do LGBT banking!

The talented Mr. Whip Man.

Gay guys for shower curtains.

Go Magazine girls.

Sexy girls marching on spring shoes. Acme brand like Wile E. Coyote's?

A lone Cagelle?

Unreal literally and figuratively.

Another angle on the unreal.

Michelle Dupree, whoever that is.

Pro LGBT Episcopals.

New York Law School girls when they're not hitting the books.

The Randy Blue Boys - up and coming, pardon the pun, gay male porn film company.

Smiling Randy Blue Boy.

Marching Pride pooch taking a breather.

Green party members letting it all hang out.

Gay City News ending the march. Note doggie in driver's side window.